Ground Zero Project using bee keeping to change lives

Ground Zero Project using bee keeping to change lives

Beekeeping is a widespread activity with a wealth of existing local knowledge and skills. The addition of a little technical information, however, can lead to greatly improved harvests of honey and beeswax. There are many ways to assist honey hunters or beekeepers to build on their resources to create more income by harvesting and processing honey more skilfully, and to obtain better prices by saving and selling beeswax and by making secondary products.

Beekeepers and trainers often lack appropriate training materials – most of the literature discusses keeping European bees in temperate zone conditions. Training is often theoretical rather than practical, placing emphasis on changing the type of hive used without providing practical guidance and follow up. New beekeepers need training in how to work with bees, how to maintain honey quality, how to separate honey from beeswax, how to render beeswax, how to manufacture secondary products and how to make beekeeping clothes and equipment. For more on training in Uganda visit Ground Zero Project Uganda

Ways for succesful bee keeping

Ways for succesful bee keeping

Beekeeping projects can improve the potential for beekeeping by planting melliferous vegetation. Indigenous honeybees have evolved and survived successfully under local conditions and will be better suited to them than introduced bees. The European honeybees introduced into many countries and African bees introduced into Central and South America currently form the basis of successful beekeeping industries.

Bee keeping to support families in Uganda

Bee keeping to support families in Uganda

There are many different entry points for projects to strengthen livelihoods with beekeeping, such as including trees for bees within planting schemes to improve pollination and increase crop harvests, assisting honey hunters through beekeeping or making and marketing honey wines or beeswax cosmetics. Beekeeping projects have been started in many developing countries and are frequently supported by international organizations, governments or NGOs. Beekeeping fits in well with other interventions and is often incorporated as one of a number implemented. Some minimum resources, however, should normally be available to people. Please visit Ground Zero Project Uganda

Making your own School chalk in Uganda

Making your own School chalk in Uganda

With tough economic times in Uganda, self sustenable programs come in handy especially for underfunded Universal Primary Education Schools. Here Ground Zero Project Uganda undertakes to train teachers in making their own school chalk and thus cutting on costs. For more visit Ground Zero Project Uganda

Providing sanitary pads to vulnerable women and girls in Uganda

Providing sanitary pads to vulnerable women and girls in Uganda

Around 36% of women and girls missed out on School and work last year! Ground Zero Project undertakes to correct this anomaly by providing free reusable sanitary pads and their panties to women in Lwengo Community. For more please visit Ground Zero Project Uganda

Organic manure making workshops in Uganda

Organic manure making workshops in Uganda

The Ground Zero Project Uganda prides itself on having successfully held and implemented a wide range of poverty eradication workshops and programs in Uganda. One such is the above in pictures which touched a very viable sector that is agriculture. The workshop was about organic manure making. For more please visit Ground Zero Project Uganda